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MYP in depth

The five areas of interaction are: 

  • Approaches to Learning (ATL): Through ATL teachers provide students with the tools to enable them to take responsibility for their own learning, thereby developing an awareness of how they learn best, of thought processes and of learning strategies.
  • Community and Service: This component requires students to take an active part in the communities in which they live, thereby encouraging responsible citizenship.
  • Human Ingenuity: Students explore in multiple ways the processes and products of human creativity, thus learning to appreciate and develop in themselves the human capacity to influence, transform, enjoy and improve the quality of life.
  • Environments: This area aims to develop students’ awareness of their interdependence with different environments so that they understand and accept their responsibilities.
  • Health and Social Education: This area deals with physical, social and emotional health and intelligence—key aspects of development leading to complete and healthy lives.

Assessment of MYP students: 

Teachers organize continuous assessment over the course of the programme taking account of specified criteria that correspond to the objectives for each subject.  During each unit of study, the students are given formative assessment tasks for which teachers are responsible. These tasks are varied and allow students to demonstrate achievement according to the required objectives within each subject group. Tasks may include:

  • open-ended,problem-solving activities and investigations
  • organized debates
  • hands-on experimentation
  • analysis
  • reflection

At the end of a unit of study, a summative assessment task is given which summarizes what has been learned. The MYP offers a criterion-related model of assessment which means that students' results are determined by their performance against set standards, not by each student's position in the overall rank order. Assessment is both quantitative and qualitative and provides feedback on the thinking processes as well as the finished piece of work. There is also an emphasis on self-assessment and peer-assessment within the programme.

The recording and reporting of individual levels of achievement are organized in ways that provide students with detailed feedback on their progress as it relates to the assessment criteria for each subject group.

Personal Project: In the final year of the programme, each student completes a personal project. This project is a significant piece of work that is the product of the student’s own initiative and creativity.

Each project must reflect a personal understanding of the areas of interaction. Students apply the skills acquired through one of these areas as well as approaches to learning.

Students are expected to choose their project, which can take many forms, and take the process through to completion under the supervision of a mentor. This involves:

  • planning
  • research
  • a high degree of personal reflection.

The personal project is assessed by teachers against a set of IB assessment criteria.

On completion of the MYP, students can choose to continue on to the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme which is a challenging two-year curriculum, primarily aimed at students aged 16 to 19. It leads to a qualification that is widely recognized by the world’s leading universities. Students may also transfer from KIS to join other educational programmes offered at Norwegian Upper Secondary Schools.(Information cited from the IB website www.ibo.org.)

MYP Curriculum Framework

The emphasis is on the fluidity of the curricular framework and the interrelatedness of the subjects. Aspects of the areas of interaction are addressed naturally through the distinct disciplines. In particular, the framework is flexible enough to allow a school to include other subjects not determined by the IB but which may be required by state or national authorities.

The overall philosophy of the programme is expressed through three fundamental concepts that support and strengthen all areas of the curriculum. These concepts are based on:

  • Intercultural Awareness
  • Holistic Learning
  • Communication

Taken as a whole, the curriculum provides a balanced education that will equip young people for effective participation in the modern world.

The five areas of interaction are:

  • Approaches to Learning
  • How do I learn best?
  • How do I know?
  • How do I communicate my understanding?

Through approaches to learning, students are provided with the tools to enable them to take responsibility for their own learning. Central to this is “learning how to learn” and developing in individuals an awareness of how they learn best, of thought processes and of learning strategies.

Approaches to learning also include:

  • organizational skills and attitudes towards work.
  • collaborative skills.communication.
  • information literacy.
  • reflection.
  • problem solving and thinking skills.
  • subject-specific and interdisciplinary conceptual understanding.

Recognizing and helping students develop the range of their capacities, positive attitudes and effective habits of mind is the shared responsibility of all teachers, and is at the core of all curriculum development and delivery.

Community and Service

  • How do we live in relation to each other?
  • How can I contribute to the community?
  • How can I help others?

Community and service starts in the classroom and extends beyond it, requiring students to take an active part in the communities in which they live.

Giving importance to the sense of community throughout the programme encourages responsible citizenship as it seeks to deepen the adolescent’s knowledge and understanding of the world around them. The emphasis is on developing community awareness and concern, and the skills needed to make an effective contribution to society.

Students are encouraged to make connections between their intellectual and social growth thereby refining their affective, creative and ethical as well as cognitive development. This is achieved through a process of discovery of self and community, and reflections inside as well as outside the classroom.

Human Ingenuity

  • Why and how do we create?
  • What are the consequences?

This area of interaction allows students to explore in multiple ways the processes and products of human creativity, and to consider their impact on society and the mind allowing students to focus on the evolution, process and products of human creativity and their impact on life and society. Human ingenuity provides opportunities for students to appreciate and develop in themselves the human capacity to create, transform, enjoy and improve the quality of life.

In particular, Human Ingenuity:

  • stresses the way humans can initiate change, whether for good or bad, and examines the consequences.
  • emphasizes both the importance of researching the developments made by people across space, time and cultures, and the importance of taking time to reflect on these developments.

In this way, Human Ingenuity goes beyond the act of creation alone, leading students to examine, experience and reflect on the creative process.

Environments

  • What are our environments?
  • What resources do we have or need?
  • What are my responsibilities?

This area of interaction aims to develop students’ awareness of their place within a wide range of environments so that they come to an appreciation and understanding of their effects on their environments. It deals with:

  • the natural environment
  • the built environment
  • the virtual environment

The study of environments assists students in:

  • understanding the links between economic, political and social issues, and how these affect the environments.
  • developing positive and responsible attitudes towards their environments.
  • gaining the skills and commitment to contribute to their environments.

Through coursework and activities, teachers can help students to gain an understanding of related concepts and issues at personal, local and global levels by guiding their investigations through the perspectives of:

  • awareness
  • responsibility
  • action
  • reflection

Health and Social Education

  • How do I think and act?
  • How am I changing?
  • How can I look after myself and others?

This area of interaction deals with key aspects of development leading to complete and healthy lives. It encompasses physical, social and emotional health and intelligence. The aim is to develop in students a sense of responsibility for their own well-being and for their physical and social environment.

In particular, the exploration of this area in the subject groups allows students to discuss and reflect on the following aspects of health:

  • physical
  • psychological
  • sociological
  • economic
  • legal

Comparisons can also be made across times and cultures.

The scope of this area of interaction goes beyond the acquisition of content knowledge. It necessitates structured learning in terms of:

  • knowledge
  • skills
  • attitudes
  • values

These provide the main focus for developing the connections between the disciplines, so that students will learn to see knowledge as an interrelated, coherent whole.

More particularly, the five areas of interaction:

  • are embedded in the subjects and developed naturally through them.
  • provide both an organization and an extension of learning within and across the subjects, through the exploration of real-life issues.
  • inspire special activities and interdisciplinary projects.
  • form part of the framework for student inquiry and take investigative learning further than subject boundaries.
  • are a vehicle for refining conceptual understanding through different perspectives.guide reflection and lead from knowledge to thoughtful action.

Continuous Assessment

Teachers organize continuous assessment over the course of the programme according to specified assessment criteria that correspond to the objectives of each subject group. Regular school assessment and reporting play a major role:

  • in the students’ and parents’ understanding of the objectives and assessment criteria.
  • in the students’ preparation for final assessment.
  • in the development of the curriculum according to the principles of the programme.

Teachers are responsible for structuring varied and valid assessment tasks (including tests and examinations) that will allow students to demonstrate achievement according to the objectives for each subject group. These include:

  • open-ended,
  • problem-solving activities
  • investigations
  • organized debates
  • hands-on experimentation
  • analysis and reflection

Personal Project

In the final year of the programme, each student completes a personal project, a significant piece of work that is the product of the student’s own initiative and creativity.

Each project must reflect a personal understanding of the areas of interaction. Students apply the skills acquired through one of these areas as well as approaches to learning.

Students are expected to choose their project, which can take many forms, and take the process through to completion under the supervision of a teacher in the school. This involves:

  • planning
  • research
  • a high degree of personal reflection.

The personal project is assessed by teachers against a set of IB assessment criteria.

The curriculum also focuses on eight academic areas or subject groups surrounding the five areas of interaction.                       

Language A                         Mathematics                        Language B                        

Arts                             Humanities                          Technology                       

Sciences                              Physical Education